Event planners, want to get better photos from your event photographer? We’ve got some advice straight from their shutter to you. We asked some event photographers to let loose and tell us what event planners do that really grinds their gears (er, lenses?) and how corporate event planners can get better results with less stress.

Afterall, on the day of your event, the last thing you want to worry about is giving art direction to a photographer—and most event photographers don’t like the idea of a micromanaging event planner either.

Here’s a few things you should avoid that will give you better results and happy photographers who will jump at the chance to work with you again.

Not Giving Enough Direction

Photographers can’t read your mind, so don’t make them. “You can’t expect us to know everything if you don’t tell us,” said one New York-based photographer. “We need to know the key shots and moments that you want to capture. Come prepared with ideas in mind.”

Give the photographer some direction on the type of look and feel you’re hoping to get from the photos. People laughing? Thoughtful conversations? Should it seem like a party atmosphere or more formal? This information will help the photographer know what moments to look for as they shoot.

Last Minute Surprises

Photographers use a wide range of gear, all designed to help them shoot specific types of photographs in specific locations. If you end up making lots of changes last minute, you run the risk of your photographer not bringing the right equipment and thus not being able to capture the shots you’re looking for. “If suddenly your indoor event is in need of some outdoor pictures, you’ve (no pun intended) shot yourself in the foot because the photographer wasn’t prepared.”

Sharing Photographer’s Info with Guests

Your attendees probably got dressed up for your event and they just can’t help but strike a pose when they see a professional photographer point a lens their way. But it’s not your photographer’s job to personally send pictures to every attendee looking for a new profile picture. “Photographers do not want to go through a night’s worth of shooting to find one photo of one person that they were basically wrangled into taking,” says our photographer source. “That’s 30 mins of unpaid, unfair work.”

Assure your attendees that you will share the photos with them after the event, and spare your photographer from an awkward conversation with attendees.

Not Sharing the Dress Code

No one likes to feel underdressed. Photographers typically choose to wear all black when shooting an event. It prevents light from their camera bouncing off their clothing and affecting the photos, plus it helps them remain inconspicuous so as not to disrupt things. But if you’re hosting a black-tie affair, your photographer is going to feel a bit sheepish if she shows up in a black t-shirt and black jeans.

Not Giving Space or Time to Work

Photographers need time and space. Changing the planned timeline is a surefire way to sour your relationship. “Rearranging the timeline, or physical space by the planner, means that the photographer cannot do their job as well as they would like,” says one Missouri-based photographer, who also once worked as an event planner himself. “Give the photographer space to do their job within realistic confines of time and space and then let them do their thing.”