The office of the future will no longer be reminiscent of how we’re used to working.

The Boston Consulting Group (BCG) has already embraced the new way employees work. In November 2016, BCG relocated to Manhattan’s 10 Hudson Yards, consolidating two former New York City offices and over 500 employees into six floors totaling 193,295 square feet. 

The new space aims to provide an environment that promotes community and interaction.  “We believe that an office is not just a place where you show up to do work,” said BCG managing partner for New York, Ross Love at the recent WORKTECH 2017 conference at Convene at 117 West 46th Street. “I think we come to work to connect with our colleagues, especially in a knowledge business like ours, where you can work anywhere.”

That means allowing employees to work how it best suits them throughout the office. In order to accommodate to the “Starbucks” generation of employees, BCG’s new location offers six different types of flexible working spaces:

Standard workstations which are the the majority of the desks offered in the space, and 75% of them are sit-stand

Convertible offices used by partner and senior employees that can be booked by others when the assignee is out of office

Huddle rooms which are bookable spaces for informal collaboration

Case team rooms that can be booked for teams of six to 10 for weeks or months at a time

Meeting rooms, in traditional or informal format, for six to 20 people

Quiet rooms that allow for individual focus work or calls

Individuals choose space based on their working style, and BCG “went for broke” with office technology at Hudson Yards. A mobile app allows employees to choose a space based on their working style, and the entire space has plug-and-play capabilities and a Bluetooth-enabled, seamless entry experience for visitors. No more badges!

The new office has fostered a more tight-knit community among the employees at BCG, he said. In a study of 100 people in the company, the frequency of interactions between them were measured. Pre-move, these employees had 2.3 average degree of separation and this improved to 1.7 degrees after the move and created more frequent interactions.

Learn more about how BCG is embracing the new workplace: 

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A Hospitality-Fueled Workplace is Next

“Not only physical assets, but the entire industry, is going to take shape in a way that really resembles the hospitality industry,” Convene co-founder, president and chief development officer Chris Kelly told the audience at WORKTECH 2017.

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A popular misconception is that millennials, who will make up 50 percent of the workforce by 2020, are demanding, Kelly continued. That’s actually not true, and we owe it to ourselves to dig a little deeper, he contends. The reason why? The way we work has fundamentally changed.

Back in college, he said, we knew where we were most productive, be it our dorm room, library or coffeeshop. But when we arrived in the workplace, everyone typically gets chained to a cubicle or war room and expected to be highly productive.

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Today’s talent expects amenities at work—a service-fueled environment and a campus of choices, or “a Googleplex of sorts,” he said—regardless of a company’s scale. But it’s difficult for many companies to meet those expectations without building infrastructure for amenities in-house. This, in turn, presents a new opportunity for buildings and landlords to become service providers to tenants and their most important assets—their people.

See more about how Convene thinks about the upcoming disruption in commercial real estate: